Dec
5
6:00 PM18:00

Midwinter Celebrations in King Lear

What would they eat in King Lear’s court, which historically existed in 800 BCE? This is the same moment at which Rome was originally founded.

Join Suzanne Cross as she entertains us with the food options and the ceremonies at this important time of year in ancient and pagan Britain.

Suzanne will prepare some of this food for us to eat! Suzanne has a rich background in food and a particular penchant for researching the food of Shakespeare’s world.

$10 at the door
Students are FREE
$5 food tickets

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Nov
7
6:00 PM18:00

The Readiness is All: Lessons from Youth Shakespeare

  • St. John’s College • Senior Common Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Caryl Farkas has been producing Shakespeare with young people for nearly 20 years. She worked with the Young Shakespeare Players in Madison, Wisconsin, doing educational outreach and directing, founded Upstart Crow Productions in Madison and, with her daughter Anna, started the Upstart Crows of Santa Fe.

The Santa Fe Crows began with three young actors (including Caryl’s younger daughter, Joy) in September 2014 who performed scenes from Twelfth Night. Those performances and outreach visits to Santa Fe schools expanded the company to 13 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and then to two full casts for Julius Caesar. The Crows now number close to 40, with most members returning for each new production.

The philosophy of the company is that anyone between 10 and 18 years old who wishes to take part may join. There are no auditions; all participants receive substantial roles and become part of the collaborative community creating each productions. Most plays are produced uncut, with the actors taking pride in their understanding of the text. Productions involve two to four casts who rehearse separately and together, offering commentary and analysis on each other’s performances.

Caryl’s experience in Madison and here has been that immersion in the text, in community, produces intelligent and deeply felt performances. Her talk will include demonstrations by some of the Upstart Crows and a look at how the company approaches direction.

$10 at the door
Students are FREE!

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Nov
4
10:00 AM10:00

A Life with Lear • one-day seminar with Robert Benedetti

  • St John’s United Methodist Church, Garden Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Robert Benedetti says, “LEAR is my life play. It was the first play I ever directed. I was at the time the Artistic Director of the University of Chicago Court Theatre; it was 1958 (24 years before James Shapiro graduated from there) and I had Elder Olson and David Bevington as my dramaturgs. I played Lear once, and I’ve directed it three times since (roughly once every twenty years), and am ready to do it again when the opportunity presents itself. I am certain it is the greatest play in the English language.”

This is an all-day seminar in a comfortable setting. We will spend some time reviewing my lifetime with LEAR and going through a close reading of the play, with actors to read scenes as they arise. The focus will be on the play itself, plus the experiences of doing it at different cultural times (1958, 1965, 1975) and how the play lived at those times and places and with different casts. But most of the seminar is about how the play works internally.

Suitable for audience members, readers, actors, directors—anyone with an interest in this most remarkable of plays.

Limited to 25 participants.
$35 fee.
Please bring your own lunch.

To register online, click here.
Or send a check to ISC • 7 Sweet Swan Lane • Santa Fe • 87508
Or email Robin Williams for more info: robin@InternationalShakespeare.center

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Oct
3
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare as a Second Language

  • St. John’s College • Senior Common Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
BreshaunJoyner.jpg

Breshaun Joyner explores how students make meaning or understanding of Macbeth and how does teaching help or hinder that process. A defining feature of her teaching of Shakespeare is an approach that utilizes second language acquisition teaching techniques.

Breshaun is a doctoral candidate in the Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies department at University of New Mexico. This talk is based on her dissertation topic: “From WTF to Aha!: An Educator’s Journey in Teaching Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

Breshaun has taught in diverse learning environments for more than twenty years, which has helped her develop an educational philosophy that promotes the idea that a sense of inventiveness and a student-centered approach to instruction is vital. This effectively introduces new ideas to students and capitalizes on what they already know. It also challenges students to absorb and develop their own thoughts, resulting in an eagerness to build an ever growing and evolving body of knowledge. Moreover, Breshaun believes the teacher takes this journey as well, thereby creating a community of learners.

Breshaun first began her foray into Shakespeare exploration when she was asked to direct a summer Shakespeare camp at a small Midwest non-profit performing arts theatre. In the years she has taught Shakespeare, the tactic she feels is best is a broad approach utilizing numerous processes. Because students are not homogeneous in terms of their learning styles, abilities, and interests, it is important to employ a number of activities and lessons that can effectively stimulate each student’s individual intellectual strengths and that support cultural background and expression. English-as-a-Second-Language teaching strategies squarely supports this pedagogy.

$10 at the door.
Students are free!

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Sep
5
6:00 PM18:00

On King Lear: “No Lives Matter” with Krishnan Venkatesh

Krishnan Venkatesh helps to launch the ISC “A Year of Lear” with a talk about the good and evil in King Lear. Always an entertaining and provocative speaker, we are happy to have him back at the Shakespeare Talks!

On King Lear: "No Lives Matter"

 
Wisdom and goodness to the vile;
Filths savor but themselves.
— Albany to Goneril, 4.2.38–39
 

King Lear presents us with a world dominated by cruel, violent people, some deranged, some coldly calculating, and in such a world the innocent and good-natured seem destined to suffer. In this talk, we’ll be contemplating the different types of good and evil in the play, including servants, henchmen, and rulers. How do good and evil come about in such a world? Do they somehow generate each other? While all the bad people get their comeuppance here, is there any hope for the innocent and virtuous? Indeed, in such a world, is it “foolish” to be good?

Krishnan Venkatesh studied English literature at Magdalene College, Cambridge, and subsequently spent more than four years in research on Shakespeare at the University of Muenster, Germany, as a wissenschaftlicher mitarbeiter (scientific co-worker) for the great Shakespearean scholar Marvin Spevack. From 1986–89 he taught literature and philosophy at Shanxi University, People’s Republic of China. Both his personal and academic background make him well suited as a “bridge” between various traditions.

Since 1989 Mr. Venkatesh has taught at St. John’s College, Santa Fe, both in the two Western Great Books programs, and he was one of the shapers of the unique Eastern Classics Master’s program, in which he has taught for more than twenty years, understanding and speaking both Chinese and Sanskrit. From 2003–2008 he was the Dean of Graduate Studies at St. John’s.

$10 at the door

Students are free!

 

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Aug
1
6:00 PM18:00

The Demise and Rise of Serious Theater in America

We are delighted to host Tony Branch, founder of the British American Drama Academy in London, as he talks about the subject of his forthcoming book, the development, demise, and future of serious theater, including Shakespeare, in Britain and America.

Tony begins with the period between Elizabeth I and 1900, then the devastating impact of silent and sound movies, radio, and television, to the collapse of the British film industry that led to British actors taking to the stage, and the preference of American actors to work in film and television. Tony also discusses the vast difference in support for the arts between the U.K. and the U.S, the impact of musical theater, the state of theater today, and how we can help.

$10 at the door
Students are free

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Jun
15
7:00 PM19:00

Cues for Passion • A Shakespearean Mash-up

One night only! The International Shakespeare Center hosts Cues for Passion: A Shakespearean Mash-up at the Violet Crown.

Cues for Passion is a fast tour of Shakespearean resilience—confessions, grieving, the moody Dane, drama—delivered with heart.

Visiting Chicago Shakespeareans Lukas Brasherfons, Greer Dubois, and Ely Phan, and Anna Farkas Associate Artistic Director of the ISC, perform a farrago of scenes from Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, The Winter’s Tale, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Henry V.

Tickets $15 at the door.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lukas Brasherfons has an MFA in Dramaturgy from the Iowa Playwrights Workshop, where he was dramaturg, director, or fight-director for more than thirty plays. Dramaturgical projects in Chicago include work with Northlight Theatre, Chicago Dramatists, Mary-Arrchie Theatre Company, Raven Theatre, Next Theatre, the Den Theatre, and Writers Theatre.

Greer Dubois is a writer, performer, and prop/puppet designer who has acted with Forward Theater and Fermat’s Last Theater in Wisconsin and has directed young people at the Young Shakespeare Players, Children’s Theater of Madison.

Anna Farkas has a BA in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College, Santa Fe. She has directed and performed with the Young Shakespeare Players, Madison Shakespeare Company, Fourth Wall Players, Chrysostomos, Upstart Crow Productions in Madison, Wisconsin, and Upstart Crows of Santa Fe.

Ely Phan is a Chicago-based theater maker with a vested interest in abolishing the gender binary and subverting traditional narratives. He holds a BA in Theatre and French language from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As the Founding Artistic Director of Fermat's Last Theater in Wisconsin, he most recently directed Merchant of Venice and Troilus and Cressida.

Once enrolled together in the Young Shakespeare Players in Madison, these actors have been creating riveting theater since their teens. Cues for Passion will be a fast tour of Shakespearean resilience—confessions, grieving, the moody Dane, drama—delivered with heart.

Tickets $15 at the door.

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Jun
6
6:00 PM18:00

The Jaws of Darkness in a Midsummer Night’s Dream

As with every Shakespeare play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream has a surface level as well as deeper levels. In this presentation, we'll take a look at the darkness that hides beneath the veneer of the fairies and lovers gallivanting around in the forest, as well as the stories behind Theseus and Hippolyta. Is Shakespeare trying to make us notice something?

Presented by Robin Williams.

$10 at the door
Students are free!

 
Or if there were a sympathy in choice,
War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,
Making it momentany as a sound,
Swift as a shadow, short as any dream,
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say “Behold!”
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion.
— Lysander, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
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May
2
6:00 PM18:00

The Shakespeare Riots with Jonathan Richards

Jonathan Richards, a novelist, film critic, actor, and political cartoonist, will talk about the infamous Shakespeare Riots that rocked New York’s Astor Place in May of 1849.

The confrontation grew out of the rivalry between the great British actor William Charles Macready and his home-grown rival, Edwin Forrest, the first American Shakespearean superstar. Class tensions and nativist pride boiled over into a full-fledged donnybrook as a mob ten thousand strong stormed the Astor Place Opera House where Macready was performing. The mayor called out the state militia, who fired on the crowd. More than twenty people were killed, and many more were injured.

It was one of the deadliest riots in New York City’s history. And it had far-reaching consequences.

$10 at the door
Students are free!

 

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Apr
4
6:00 PM18:00

The Weight of Pathos in King Lear with Natalie Elliot

The Weight of Pathos in King Lear

One of the most profound and puzzling moments in Shakespeare’s corpus appears in King Lear, when Edgar leads the blinded Gloucester to an imaginary Dover. In this pathos-filled scene, Edgar pretends to bring his father to the cliffs, where Gloucester believes he will fall to his death. Since Gloucester is not actually at the edge, he does not fall and die, but Edgar is able to convince Gloucester that he has fallen.

The scene is puzzling because it shows that Gloucester is so ill-attuned to his spatial perceptions that he is willing to entertain the story that he has fallen. Why does Shakespeare stage this trick? To respond to the question, we will puzzle through some of Shakespeare’s poetic play with the nature of weight.


Natalie Elliot is a faculty member at St. John’s College, where she teaches cross-disciplinary courses in classics, history of science, mathematics, English literature, philosophy, and music. Natalie’s research focuses on early modern literary works that explore the cultural and philosophical significance of scientific discovery and technological change. Her past research has uncovered Francis Bacon’s mythological teaching on life-extension and explored the conflicts between classical tragedy and scientific progress. At present, she is at work on a book that explains Shakespeare’s poetic engagement with early modern science. Natalie holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Texas, where she specialized in political theory and focused on the study of politics through literature. In addition to her appointment at St. John’s College, Natalie has held research and teaching positions at The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, Indiana University’s Hutton Honors College, and Southern Methodist University.

$10 at the door

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Mar
7
6:00 PM18:00

Jocelyn Davis on Henry V and Crisis Leadership

Jocelyn Davis gives a fascinating talk about Henry V's leadership. "These are turbulent times. What can we learn from King Henry the Fifth about the keys to effective leadership in a crisis? Among other things: When disaster strikes, stay in the learning zone."

International business author and consultant Jocelyn Davis draws on her latest book, The Greats on Leadership, to show why Shakespeare is a leader’s best advisor when the world turns upside down.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Jocelyn Davis is a writer and consultant with 25 years’ experience in the corporate learning industry. Before founding her company, Seven Learning, she was head of R&D for The Forum Corporation, a global leadership development firm. She is author of The Greats on Leadership: Classic Wisdom for Modern Managers (Hachette); co-author of Strategic Speed: Mobilize People, Accelerate Execution (Harvard Business Press); and has published widely on leadership, strategy execution, and workplace learning. Her clients have included companies such as Microsoft, Disney, and Unilever.

Known as an exceptional leader herself, Jocelyn is the recipient of awards for excellence in management and product innovation. She holds an M.A. in Philosophy and is currently working on a master’s degree in Eastern Classics at St. John’s College, Santa Fe.

$10

For more about Ms. Davis, see her web site: JocelynRDavis.com

 

 

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Feb
7
6:00 PM18:00

Ambrose Ferber on Fight Choreography

“A hit, a very palpable hit.”

To Elizabethans, swordplay and the study of “the fence” was integral to daily life. As such, the bladed action of the plays held a particular fascination for contemporary audiences. In this talk, we will discuss how Elizabethan companies staged these fights, and how the process has evolvedover the centuries, including mid-20th century all the way up the present day. We’ll also take a look at the sorts of weapons currently being used, how we balance realism, historical accuracy, and safety, and we’ll even have a chance to learn andpractice a few actual techniques. If you'd like to be a participant, be sure to wear clothing you can move around in, including something resembling an athletic shoe.

Ambrose Ferber got his start in theatre as an injured boy in Commedia dell'Arte when he was five and has since performed in Colorado, New Mexico, and North Carolina. Some of his favorite roles are Jack Worthing in The Importance of Being Earnest, John Jasper in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, John Hancock in 1776, Pablo Picasso in Picasso at the Lapin Agile, Barnette Lloyd in Crimes of the Heart, and Miles in The Drawer Boy. He got to swing steel as The Douglas in Henry IV, Part 1 and went on to serve as the fight captain, lead fighter, fight trainer, and fight director in a number of shows, including Romeo and Juliet, Les Miserables, Extremities, Cyrano, and Macbeth.

Ambrose is a certified Advanced Actor Combatant with the Society of American Fight Directors, and a member of Screen Actors Guild. Ambrose can be seen in the feature film Eyeborgs and in various TV shows, usually playing some kind of cop. He currently lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with his wife, Bex, and their daughters, Fiona and Chloe.

$10 at the door; students are free

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Jan
3
6:00 PM18:00

Sonnets: The Neurosis of Love with Krishnan Venkatesh

Krishnan Venkatesh, tutor at St. John's, speaks on the Shakespeare’s Sonnets: The Madness of Love.

There are really only two sonnet sequences in English that plumb the depths of love’s madness—Shakespeare’s Sonnets and George Meredith’s Modern Love. It is amazing what being in love can do to an otherwise reasonable person: all of a sudden we find ourselves tormented with desires and anxieties we didn't know we could have, or that we once had and thought we could outgrow. This evening we’ll study a handful of sonnets together in the hope of getting closer to Shakespeare's vision of “this crazy little thing called love.”

Krishnan Venkatesh has taught Western and Eastern Great Books at St. John’s College for almost thirty years. He is also a Shakespeare scholar, having spent several years on the minutiae of editions. Shakespeare has been central to his life for more than forty years, and at St. John's, reading the Works alongside writers like Plato and Montaigne has only deepened his respect for Shakespeare’s insight into the human condition.

$10, payable at the door

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Dec
20
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare’s Kitchen

Shakespeare’s language is full of the everyday world of 400 years ago and its food. From the traditional country market town of Stratford with simple roasts and few spices, to groaning banquets at Court (where perhaps the Players snatched the leftover “broken meats” after the show!) he would have been familiar with the whole range of Elizabethan and Jacobean cooking.

But what was food all about in that golden age and how does it differ from, and complement, our twenty-first century tastes? If you want to voyage to a nobleman’s house in 1606 for a banquet today, what would you choose to prepare that would be both authentic and tasty?

$10 payable at the door

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .    
Suzanne Cross has been studying medieval and Elizabethan food since 1975, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art published a “curiosity” book about the cooking at the Court of Richard II, c. 1390. Her first “Queen’s Banquet” involved capon and Orangeado Pie in 1977. Since then, she’s presented Shakespearean Banquets in Santa Fe and points east and will discuss not only the fine points of food in Shakespeare’s Day, but recipes (including “kickshaws”) you can create to celebrate your own inner Will.

Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of short-legged hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kickshaws, tell William cook.
— Robert Shallow in 2 Henry IV
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Dec
3
1:00 PM13:00

Youth Shakespeare Festival

The ISC has been working with local educators and renowned Shakespeareans to celebrate Shakespeare with high school students, and December 3 is the Festival!

Since August, participating students from New Mexico School for the Arts, Santa Fe High School, Santa Fe Indian School, Academy for Technology and the Classics, and the Upstart Crows of Santa Fe have been working with professional Shakespearean actors and directors to hone their performances of short scenes from Shakespeare's plays, which they will present at the Youth Shakespeare Festival.

Guest artists include Devon Glover (The Sonnet Man), Ariana Karp (Ducdame Ensemble), Dr. Breshaun Joyner, and Dr. Robin Williams.

Visit our site for more details: YSFSantaFe.org.

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Nov
5
to Nov 12

Acting Shakespeare's Text with Wendy Chapin and Robin Williams

  • Armory for the Arts Theater (inside Bataan Military Museum) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Wendy Chapin and Robin Williams to explore both the text and acting of Shakespeare. The workshop is limited to ten actors.

Saturday • November 5 • 9 to noon
Work with Robin to discover what Shakespeare is telling you, the actor, in your chosen speech.

Saturday • November 12 • 9 to noon
Work with Wendy on how to apply action and intention to Shakespeare’s text.

Where: Santa Fe Performing Arts
Armory for the Arts Theater
(inside Bataan Military Museum)
1050 Old Pecos Trail • Santa Fe

Cost: $100
Register: SFPerformingArts@gmail.com
or 505.982.7992

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Nov
1
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare’s Genius as a Writer

If you think you love Shakespeare’s writing, just wait until Dr. Benedetti shows you just how amazing it us, just how skilled Shakespeare was as a writer. Bob will show us how Shakespeare takes advantage of the iambic pentameter rhythm and uses poetic techniques like no one has before or since.

Dr. Benedetti gives us a glimpse into Shakespeare’s mind at work—and it’s astounding.

Join us for an enlightening evening!

$10 at the door

For Orpheus’ lute was strung with poets’ sinews,
Whose golden touch could soften steel and stones,
Make tigers tame, and huge leviathans
Forsake unsounded deeps to dance on sands.
— Proteus in Two Gentlemen of Verona
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Oct
11
6:00 PM18:00

What is your Humour?

Why does Petruchio not let Kate eat the over-roasted meat? Why does Beatrice suddenly have a cold in the middle of the play, and Benedick has a toothache? Why does Othello have an epileptic fit and so readily believe Iago’s lies? Why is Ophelia’s death naturally by water?

These, and hundreds of other matters in Shakespeare’s plays, are related to the ancient theory of the humours, the four bodily spirits that control one’s temperament. Elizabethan medicine, cookbooks, herbals, and basic everyday living revolved around balancing these four humours. Robin Williams has studied the humours extensively and delights in helping us discover how to control our selves in an Elizabethan way.  ;-)

Download this personality test to determine which humour tends to run your personality, and discover which Shakespeare characters you are most akin to, and how to balance your own humours!

Cost: $10

As it is a spare life, look you, it fits my humour well.
— Touchstone in As You Like It
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Sep
6
6:00 PM18:00

Every Performance is an Interpretation!

Shakespeare is famously ambiguous on the page: How does Isabella respond to the Duke’s two marriage proposals? Are Katherina and Petruchio in an abusive relationship or a joyful partnership of fire? How does Goneril respond to Lear’s diatribe on her fertility?

Tonight we have professional actors presenting various interpretations of scenes, providing an excellent insight into how Shakespeare’s ambiguity creates so many wide-ranging presentations of the rich characters. Audience members will be encouraged to participate in the direction of the interpretations, so come with your opinions and make them visible on the stage!

Cost: $10

So our virtues lie in the interpretation of the time.
— Tullus Aufidius in Coriolanus
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Sep
3
7:00 PM19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

 
Antonio, I am married to a wife
Which is as dear to me as life itself;
But life itself, my wife, and all the world,
Are not with me esteem’d above thy life:
I would lose all, ay, sacrifice them all
Here to this devil, to deliver you.
— Bassanio in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

View Event →
Sep
2
7:00 PM19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

I will do any thing, Nerissa, ere I’ll be married to a sponge.
— Portia in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

View Event →
Aug
30
8:00 PM20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Meow Wolf
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Tuesday    August 30

Pray God defend me!
A little thing would make me tell them
how much I lack of a man.
— Viola in Twelfth Night
View Event →
Aug
29
8:00 PM20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Meow Wolf
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Monday    8/29   (talk-back after the show)
Tuesday    8/30

Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?
— Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night
View Event →
Aug
27
7:00 PM19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

This house, these servants and this same myself
Are yours, my lord: I give them with this ring;
Which when you part from, lose, or give away,
Let it presage the ruin of your love
And be my vantage to exclaim on you.
— Portia in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

View Event →
Aug
26
7:00 PM19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

If a Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach me, I will execute.
— Shylock in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

View Event →
Aug
24
8:00 PM20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Meow Wolf
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Wednes    8/24
Monday    8/29   (talk-back after the show)
Tuesday    8/30

I was adored once too.
— Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night
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Aug
22
8:00 PM20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf • SOLD OUT!!

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Performed at Meow Wolf, throughout the site
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Monday    8/22
Wednes    8/24
Monday    8/29   (talk-back after the show)
Tuesday    8/30

Take thy fortunes up;
Be that thou know’st thou art, and then thou art
As great as that thou fear’st.
— Olivia in Twelfth Night
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Aug
2
6:00 PM18:00

Merchant of Venice Panel Discussion

Join the discussion with Rabbi Ron Wittenstein, St. John's scholar Natalie Elliot, theater historian Peggy Laurel, actor Paul Walsky, and dramaturg Robin Williams. This discussion precedes the ISC performance of The Merchant of Venice to provide a richer view of this problem play.

$10, payable at the door.

If you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that.
— Shylock in The Merchant of Venice
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Jul
22
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare in the Mine Shaft

Join the International Shakespeare Center in the funky fabulous reborn mining town of Madrid, New Mexico, for a dinner-theater treat, Friday, July 22, 2016.

The evening begins with a gourmet meal in one of the last great roadhouses, the Mine Shaft Tavern, serving mesquite-smoked prime rib and lobster tail (salmon option available). After dinner, take a few moments to wander through the Madrid Old Coal Town Museum. At last, thrill to excellent scenes from Shakespeare performed in the historic Engine House Theater by members of the award-winning Ducdame Ensemble from New York City.

Of course this is a fundraising event to help launch our first repertory season in Santa Fe 2016!

Tickets are $100 per person; $70 is fully tax deductible (the ISC is a federally recognized 501c3.)

Price includes meal (tax and tip included, but not drinks), museum entrance fee, and performance.

Buy tickets here: ShakespeareInTheMineShaft.BrownPaperTickets.com 

Limited seating—buy tickets early for this delightfully unique and very cool event!

If I like thee no worse after dinner, I will not part from thee yet. Dinner, ho, dinner!
— Lear in King Lear
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Jul
19
6:00 PM18:00

Part 2 • Professional Classical/Shakespeare Workshop

The International Shakespeare Center invites you to take part in professional classical/shakespearean acting workshops with Masters graduates from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA): Ariana Karp and Will McKay.

The LAMDA conservatory approach offers a holistic perspective on practice, helping actors access classical text through physical engagement. The workshops will feature vocal, physical, and group exercises for actors of all ages.

During their last visit to Santa Fe, Karp directed Ducdame Ensemble’s Dames of Thrones during the First Folio February events, and McKay performed in the show. Both acted as demonstrators for LAMDA faculty Judith Phillips and Rodney Cottier in their workshops.

The Tuesday July 19 workshop includes a series of vocal, physical, and group exercises to approach Shakespeare or other classical text from a holistic perspective and physical engagement. Actors should bring in a classical speech from Shakespeare or other Elizabethan, Jacobean, or Restoration playwright of between 12 to 25 lines.

Tuition: $60 each class (Saturday July 16 & Tuesday July 19); participants may choose one or both classes.

Tuesday • July 19
6 to 9 p.m.
Warehouse 21

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserve your place! Call 505.466.3533 or email Caryl@InternationalShakespeare.center
Feel free to tell any actors or aspiring actors or students who you think might enjoy this opportunity.

The ISC is delighted to offer this opportunity to engage in conservatory-style training with the community and hopes to see participating actors at future auditions for collaborations with Ducdame Ensemble.

 

View Event →
Jul
16
1:00 PM13:00

Part 1 • Professional Classical/Shakespeare Workshops

The International Shakespeare Center invites you to take part in professional classical/shakespearean acting workshops with Masters graduates from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA): Ariana Karp and Will McKay.

The LAMDA conservatory approach offers a holistic perspective on practice, helping actors access classical text through physical engagement. The workshops will feature vocal, physical, and group exercises for actors of all ages.

During their last visit to Santa Fe, Karp directed Ducdame Ensemble’s Dames of Thrones during the First Folio February events, and McKay performed in the show. Both acted as demonstrators for LAMDA faculty Judith Phillips and Rodney Cottier in their workshops.

The Saturday July 16 workshop features an exploration of improvisation within the context of classical theater. The exercises are designed to facilitate listening and collaboratively working with your scene partner. Actors are asked to bring either the Brutus/Cassius argument scene in Julius Caesar, Act 4.3.1–123 OR the Lady Macbeth/Macbeth scene, “Was the hope drunk,” Macbeth 1.7.37, from Lady Macbeth’s entrance to the end of the scene.

The Tuesday July 19 workshop includes a series of vocal, physical, and group exercises to approach Shakespeare or other classical text from a holistic perspective and physical engagement. Actors should bring in a classical speech from Shakespeare or other Elizabethan, Jacobean, or Restoration playwright of between 12 to 25 lines.

Tuition: $60 each class; participants may choose one or both classes.

Saturday • July 16
1 to 4 p.m.
Eldorado Community Center

Tuesday • July 19
6 to 9 p.m.
Warehouse 21

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserve your place! Call 505.466.3533 or email Caryl@InternationalShakespeare.center
Feel free to tell any actors or aspiring actors or students who you think might enjoy this opportunity.

The ISC is delighted to offer this opportunity to engage in conservatory-style training with the community and hopes to see participating actors at future auditions for collaborations with Ducdame Ensemble.

 

View Event →