Jun
6
6:00 pm18:00

The Jaws of Darkness in a Midsummer Night’s Dream

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

As with every Shakespeare play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream has a surface level as well as deeper levels. In this presentation, we'll take a look at the darkness that hides beneath the veneer of the fairies and lovers gallivanting around in the forest, as well as the stories behind Theseus and Hippolyta. Is Shakespeare trying to make us notice something?

Presented by Robin Williams.

$10 at the door
Students are free!

 
Or if there were a sympathy in choice,
War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,
Making it momentany as a sound,
Swift as a shadow, short as any dream,
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say “Behold!”
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion.
— Lysander, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Sep
5
6:00 pm18:00

Shakespeare as a Second Language

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Breshaun Joyner, doctoral candidate, teacher, and actor, talks about “Shakespeare as a Second Language” and how the concept can help teachers and readers more fully engage with the text.

More info soon!

$10 at the door
Students are free


May
2
6:00 pm18:00

The Shakespeare Riots with Jonathan Richards

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Jonathan Richards, a novelist, film critic, actor, and political cartoonist, will talk about the infamous Shakespeare Riots that rocked New York’s Astor Place in May of 1849.

The confrontation grew out of the rivalry between the great British actor William Charles Macready and his home-grown rival, Edwin Forrest, the first American Shakespearean superstar. Class tensions and nativist pride boiled over into a full-fledged donnybrook as a mob ten thousand strong stormed the Astor Place Opera House where Macready was performing. The mayor called out the state militia, who fired on the crowd. More than twenty people were killed, and many more were injured.

It was one of the deadliest riots in New York City’s history. And it had far-reaching consequences.

$10 at the door
Students are free!

 

Apr
4
6:00 pm18:00

The Weight of Pathos in King Lear with Natalie Elliot

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

The Weight of Pathos in King Lear

One of the most profound and puzzling moments in Shakespeare’s corpus appears in King Lear, when Edgar leads the blinded Gloucester to an imaginary Dover. In this pathos-filled scene, Edgar pretends to bring his father to the cliffs, where Gloucester believes he will fall to his death. Since Gloucester is not actually at the edge, he does not fall and die, but Edgar is able to convince Gloucester that he has fallen.

The scene is puzzling because it shows that Gloucester is so ill-attuned to his spatial perceptions that he is willing to entertain the story that he has fallen. Why does Shakespeare stage this trick? To respond to the question, we will puzzle through some of Shakespeare’s poetic play with the nature of weight.


Natalie Elliot is a faculty member at St. John’s College, where she teaches cross-disciplinary courses in classics, history of science, mathematics, English literature, philosophy, and music. Natalie’s research focuses on early modern literary works that explore the cultural and philosophical significance of scientific discovery and technological change. Her past research has uncovered Francis Bacon’s mythological teaching on life-extension and explored the conflicts between classical tragedy and scientific progress. At present, she is at work on a book that explains Shakespeare’s poetic engagement with early modern science. Natalie holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Texas, where she specialized in political theory and focused on the study of politics through literature. In addition to her appointment at St. John’s College, Natalie has held research and teaching positions at The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, Indiana University’s Hutton Honors College, and Southern Methodist University.

$10 at the door

Mar
7
6:00 pm18:00

Jocelyn Davis on Henry V and Crisis Leadership

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Jocelyn Davis gives a fascinating talk about Henry V's leadership. "These are turbulent times. What can we learn from King Henry the Fifth about the keys to effective leadership in a crisis? Among other things: When disaster strikes, stay in the learning zone."

International business author and consultant Jocelyn Davis draws on her latest book, The Greats on Leadership, to show why Shakespeare is a leader’s best advisor when the world turns upside down.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Jocelyn Davis is a writer and consultant with 25 years’ experience in the corporate learning industry. Before founding her company, Seven Learning, she was head of R&D for The Forum Corporation, a global leadership development firm. She is author of The Greats on Leadership: Classic Wisdom for Modern Managers (Hachette); co-author of Strategic Speed: Mobilize People, Accelerate Execution (Harvard Business Press); and has published widely on leadership, strategy execution, and workplace learning. Her clients have included companies such as Microsoft, Disney, and Unilever.

Known as an exceptional leader herself, Jocelyn is the recipient of awards for excellence in management and product innovation. She holds an M.A. in Philosophy and is currently working on a master’s degree in Eastern Classics at St. John’s College, Santa Fe.

$10

For more about Ms. Davis, see her web site: JocelynRDavis.com

 

 

Feb
7
6:00 pm18:00

Ambrose Ferber on Fight Choreography

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

“A hit, a very palpable hit.”

To Elizabethans, swordplay and the study of “the fence” was integral to daily life. As such, the bladed action of the plays held a particular fascination for contemporary audiences. In this talk, we will discuss how Elizabethan companies staged these fights, and how the process has evolvedover the centuries, including mid-20th century all the way up the present day. We’ll also take a look at the sorts of weapons currently being used, how we balance realism, historical accuracy, and safety, and we’ll even have a chance to learn andpractice a few actual techniques. If you'd like to be a participant, be sure to wear clothing you can move around in, including something resembling an athletic shoe.

Ambrose Ferber got his start in theatre as an injured boy in Commedia dell'Arte when he was five and has since performed in Colorado, New Mexico, and North Carolina. Some of his favorite roles are Jack Worthing in The Importance of Being Earnest, John Jasper in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, John Hancock in 1776, Pablo Picasso in Picasso at the Lapin Agile, Barnette Lloyd in Crimes of the Heart, and Miles in The Drawer Boy. He got to swing steel as The Douglas in Henry IV, Part 1 and went on to serve as the fight captain, lead fighter, fight trainer, and fight director in a number of shows, including Romeo and Juliet, Les Miserables, Extremities, Cyrano, and Macbeth.

Ambrose is a certified Advanced Actor Combatant with the Society of American Fight Directors, and a member of Screen Actors Guild. Ambrose can be seen in the feature film Eyeborgs and in various TV shows, usually playing some kind of cop. He currently lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with his wife, Bex, and their daughters, Fiona and Chloe.

$10 at the door; students are free

Jan
3
6:00 pm18:00

Sonnets: The Neurosis of Love with Krishnan Venkatesh

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Krishnan Venkatesh, tutor at St. John's, speaks on the Shakespeare’s Sonnets: The Madness of Love.

There are really only two sonnet sequences in English that plumb the depths of love’s madness—Shakespeare’s Sonnets and George Meredith’s Modern Love. It is amazing what being in love can do to an otherwise reasonable person: all of a sudden we find ourselves tormented with desires and anxieties we didn't know we could have, or that we once had and thought we could outgrow. This evening we’ll study a handful of sonnets together in the hope of getting closer to Shakespeare's vision of “this crazy little thing called love.”

Krishnan Venkatesh has taught Western and Eastern Great Books at St. John’s College for almost thirty years. He is also a Shakespeare scholar, having spent several years on the minutiae of editions. Shakespeare has been central to his life for more than forty years, and at St. John's, reading the Works alongside writers like Plato and Montaigne has only deepened his respect for Shakespeare’s insight into the human condition.

$10, payable at the door

Dec
20
6:00 pm18:00

Shakespeare’s Kitchen

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Shakespeare’s language is full of the everyday world of 400 years ago and its food. From the traditional country market town of Stratford with simple roasts and few spices, to groaning banquets at Court (where perhaps the Players snatched the leftover “broken meats” after the show!) he would have been familiar with the whole range of Elizabethan and Jacobean cooking.

But what was food all about in that golden age and how does it differ from, and complement, our twenty-first century tastes? If you want to voyage to a nobleman’s house in 1606 for a banquet today, what would you choose to prepare that would be both authentic and tasty?

$10 payable at the door

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .    
Suzanne Cross has been studying medieval and Elizabethan food since 1975, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art published a “curiosity” book about the cooking at the Court of Richard II, c. 1390. Her first “Queen’s Banquet” involved capon and Orangeado Pie in 1977. Since then, she’s presented Shakespearean Banquets in Santa Fe and points east and will discuss not only the fine points of food in Shakespeare’s Day, but recipes (including “kickshaws”) you can create to celebrate your own inner Will.

Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of short-legged hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kickshaws, tell William cook.
— Robert Shallow in 2 Henry IV
Dec
3
1:00 pm13:00

Youth Shakespeare Festival

  • Scottish Rite Temple

The ISC has been working with local educators and renowned Shakespeareans to celebrate Shakespeare with high school students, and December 3 is the Festival!

Since August, participating students from New Mexico School for the Arts, Santa Fe High School, Santa Fe Indian School, Academy for Technology and the Classics, and the Upstart Crows of Santa Fe have been working with professional Shakespearean actors and directors to hone their performances of short scenes from Shakespeare's plays, which they will present at the Youth Shakespeare Festival.

Guest artists include Devon Glover (The Sonnet Man), Ariana Karp (Ducdame Ensemble), Dr. Breshaun Joyner, and Dr. Robin Williams.

Visit our site for more details: YSFSantaFe.org.

Nov
5
Nov 12

Acting Shakespeare's Text with Wendy Chapin and Robin Williams

  • Armory for the Arts Theater (inside Bataan Military Museum)

Join Wendy Chapin and Robin Williams to explore both the text and acting of Shakespeare. The workshop is limited to ten actors.

Saturday • November 5 • 9 to noon
Work with Robin to discover what Shakespeare is telling you, the actor, in your chosen speech.

Saturday • November 12 • 9 to noon
Work with Wendy on how to apply action and intention to Shakespeare’s text.

Where: Santa Fe Performing Arts
Armory for the Arts Theater
(inside Bataan Military Museum)
1050 Old Pecos Trail • Santa Fe

Cost: $100
Register: SFPerformingArts@gmail.com
or 505.982.7992

Nov
1
6:00 pm18:00

Shakespeare’s Genius as a Writer

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

If you think you love Shakespeare’s writing, just wait until Dr. Benedetti shows you just how amazing it us, just how skilled Shakespeare was as a writer. Bob will show us how Shakespeare takes advantage of the iambic pentameter rhythm and uses poetic techniques like no one has before or since.

Dr. Benedetti gives us a glimpse into Shakespeare’s mind at work—and it’s astounding.

Join us for an enlightening evening!

$10 at the door

For Orpheus’ lute was strung with poets’ sinews,
Whose golden touch could soften steel and stones,
Make tigers tame, and huge leviathans
Forsake unsounded deeps to dance on sands.
— Proteus in Two Gentlemen of Verona
Oct
11
6:00 pm18:00

What is your Humour?

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Why does Petruchio not let Kate eat the over-roasted meat? Why does Beatrice suddenly have a cold in the middle of the play, and Benedick has a toothache? Why does Othello have an epileptic fit and so readily believe Iago’s lies? Why is Ophelia’s death naturally by water?

These, and hundreds of other matters in Shakespeare’s plays, are related to the ancient theory of the humours, the four bodily spirits that control one’s temperament. Elizabethan medicine, cookbooks, herbals, and basic everyday living revolved around balancing these four humours. Robin Williams has studied the humours extensively and delights in helping us discover how to control our selves in an Elizabethan way.  ;-)

Download this personality test to determine which humour tends to run your personality, and discover which Shakespeare characters you are most akin to, and how to balance your own humours!

Cost: $10

As it is a spare life, look you, it fits my humour well.
— Touchstone in As You Like It
Sep
6
6:00 pm18:00

Every Performance is an Interpretation!

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Shakespeare is famously ambiguous on the page: How does Isabella respond to the Duke’s two marriage proposals? Are Katherina and Petruchio in an abusive relationship or a joyful partnership of fire? How does Goneril respond to Lear’s diatribe on her fertility?

Tonight we have professional actors presenting various interpretations of scenes, providing an excellent insight into how Shakespeare’s ambiguity creates so many wide-ranging presentations of the rich characters. Audience members will be encouraged to participate in the direction of the interpretations, so come with your opinions and make them visible on the stage!

Cost: $10

So our virtues lie in the interpretation of the time.
— Tullus Aufidius in Coriolanus
Sep
3
7:00 pm19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

 
Antonio, I am married to a wife
Which is as dear to me as life itself;
But life itself, my wife, and all the world,
Are not with me esteem’d above thy life:
I would lose all, ay, sacrifice them all
Here to this devil, to deliver you.
— Bassanio in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

Sep
2
7:00 pm19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

I will do any thing, Nerissa, ere I’ll be married to a sponge.
— Portia in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

Aug
30
8:00 pm20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf

  • Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Meow Wolf
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Tuesday    August 30

Pray God defend me!
A little thing would make me tell them
how much I lack of a man.
— Viola in Twelfth Night
Aug
29
8:00 pm20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Meow Wolf
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Monday    8/29   (talk-back after the show)
Tuesday    8/30

Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?
— Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night
Aug
27
7:00 pm19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

This house, these servants and this same myself
Are yours, my lord: I give them with this ring;
Which when you part from, lose, or give away,
Let it presage the ruin of your love
And be my vantage to exclaim on you.
— Portia in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

Aug
26
7:00 pm19:00

The Merchant of Venice : live performance

  • Performing Arts Center at Santa Fe High School

The Merchant of Venice is a play fraught with moral dilemmas, anti-foreigner sentiment, hypocrisy, and even perhaps love. Join us for a look at this provocative play.

Performing Arts Center on the campus of Santa Fe High School
2100 Yucca St, Santa Fe, NM (for directions, see below)

7 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 6:30 p.m. before each performance
Talk-back with the cast on Friday, September 2

Click here for tickets: $25  
($15 for students with ID, available at door)

Friday         8/26
Saturday     8/27
Friday         9/2   (talk-back after the show)
Saturday     9/3

If a Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach me, I will execute.
— Shylock in The Merchant of Venice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To get to the Performing Arts Center, enter the Santa Fe High School parking lot at 2100 Yucca Street.

At the fork, bear to the RIGHT, toward the Student Parking area; park in Student Parking as close to the steps as you can.

As you go up the steps toward campus, the Performing Arts Center is the first building on the right.

Handicap access is up the ramp by the steps.

Aug
24
8:00 pm20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf

  • Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Meow Wolf
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Wednes    8/24
Monday    8/29   (talk-back after the show)
Tuesday    8/30

I was adored once too.
— Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night
Aug
22
8:00 pm20:00

Twelfth Night at Meow Wolf • SOLD OUT!!

  • Meow Wolf

Twelfth Night includes two sisters with dead brothers, separated twins, mistaken identities, sword fights and drunkenness, misplaced love all around, and bullying cruelty. What more could you ask?

This is immersion theater—you will follow the actors through the Meow Wolf art installation as the performance takes place throughout.

Performed at Meow Wolf, throughout the site
1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe, NM.

Ticket includes entrance to Meow Wolf's art installation, “The House of Eternal Return” at 6 p.m.; performance is at 8 p.m.

Pre-show talks with Robin Williams at 7:30 p.m. in the installation.
Talk-back with the cast after the show on Monday 8/29.

Click here for tickets: $35, available through Meow Wolf;
includes admission to Meow Wolf

Monday    8/22
Wednes    8/24
Monday    8/29   (talk-back after the show)
Tuesday    8/30

Take thy fortunes up;
Be that thou know’st thou art, and then thou art
As great as that thou fear’st.
— Olivia in Twelfth Night
Aug
2
6:00 pm18:00

Merchant of Venice Panel Discussion

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Join the discussion with Rabbi Ron Wittenstein, St. John's scholar Natalie Elliot, theater historian Peggy Laurel, actor Paul Walsky, and dramaturg Robin Williams. This discussion precedes the ISC performance of The Merchant of Venice to provide a richer view of this problem play.

$10, payable at the door.

If you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that.
— Shylock in The Merchant of Venice
Jul
22
6:00 pm18:00

Shakespeare in the Mine Shaft

Join the International Shakespeare Center in the funky fabulous reborn mining town of Madrid, New Mexico, for a dinner-theater treat, Friday, July 22, 2016.

The evening begins with a gourmet meal in one of the last great roadhouses, the Mine Shaft Tavern, serving mesquite-smoked prime rib and lobster tail (salmon option available). After dinner, take a few moments to wander through the Madrid Old Coal Town Museum. At last, thrill to excellent scenes from Shakespeare performed in the historic Engine House Theater by members of the award-winning Ducdame Ensemble from New York City.

Of course this is a fundraising event to help launch our first repertory season in Santa Fe 2016!

Tickets are $100 per person; $70 is fully tax deductible (the ISC is a federally recognized 501c3.)

Price includes meal (tax and tip included, but not drinks), museum entrance fee, and performance.

Buy tickets here: ShakespeareInTheMineShaft.BrownPaperTickets.com 

Limited seating—buy tickets early for this delightfully unique and very cool event!

If I like thee no worse after dinner, I will not part from thee yet. Dinner, ho, dinner!
— Lear in King Lear
Jul
19
6:00 pm18:00

Part 2 • Professional Classical/Shakespeare Workshop

  • Warehouse 21

The International Shakespeare Center invites you to take part in professional classical/shakespearean acting workshops with Masters graduates from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA): Ariana Karp and Will McKay.

The LAMDA conservatory approach offers a holistic perspective on practice, helping actors access classical text through physical engagement. The workshops will feature vocal, physical, and group exercises for actors of all ages.

During their last visit to Santa Fe, Karp directed Ducdame Ensemble’s Dames of Thrones during the First Folio February events, and McKay performed in the show. Both acted as demonstrators for LAMDA faculty Judith Phillips and Rodney Cottier in their workshops.

The Tuesday July 19 workshop includes a series of vocal, physical, and group exercises to approach Shakespeare or other classical text from a holistic perspective and physical engagement. Actors should bring in a classical speech from Shakespeare or other Elizabethan, Jacobean, or Restoration playwright of between 12 to 25 lines.

Tuition: $60 each class (Saturday July 16 & Tuesday July 19); participants may choose one or both classes.

Tuesday • July 19
6 to 9 p.m.
Warehouse 21

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserve your place! Call 505.466.3533 or email Caryl@InternationalShakespeare.center
Feel free to tell any actors or aspiring actors or students who you think might enjoy this opportunity.

The ISC is delighted to offer this opportunity to engage in conservatory-style training with the community and hopes to see participating actors at future auditions for collaborations with Ducdame Ensemble.

 

Jul
16
1:00 pm13:00

Part 1 • Professional Classical/Shakespeare Workshops

  • Eldorado Community Center

The International Shakespeare Center invites you to take part in professional classical/shakespearean acting workshops with Masters graduates from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA): Ariana Karp and Will McKay.

The LAMDA conservatory approach offers a holistic perspective on practice, helping actors access classical text through physical engagement. The workshops will feature vocal, physical, and group exercises for actors of all ages.

During their last visit to Santa Fe, Karp directed Ducdame Ensemble’s Dames of Thrones during the First Folio February events, and McKay performed in the show. Both acted as demonstrators for LAMDA faculty Judith Phillips and Rodney Cottier in their workshops.

The Saturday July 16 workshop features an exploration of improvisation within the context of classical theater. The exercises are designed to facilitate listening and collaboratively working with your scene partner. Actors are asked to bring either the Brutus/Cassius argument scene in Julius Caesar, Act 4.3.1–123 OR the Lady Macbeth/Macbeth scene, “Was the hope drunk,” Macbeth 1.7.37, from Lady Macbeth’s entrance to the end of the scene.

The Tuesday July 19 workshop includes a series of vocal, physical, and group exercises to approach Shakespeare or other classical text from a holistic perspective and physical engagement. Actors should bring in a classical speech from Shakespeare or other Elizabethan, Jacobean, or Restoration playwright of between 12 to 25 lines.

Tuition: $60 each class; participants may choose one or both classes.

Saturday • July 16
1 to 4 p.m.
Eldorado Community Center

Tuesday • July 19
6 to 9 p.m.
Warehouse 21

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserve your place! Call 505.466.3533 or email Caryl@InternationalShakespeare.center
Feel free to tell any actors or aspiring actors or students who you think might enjoy this opportunity.

The ISC is delighted to offer this opportunity to engage in conservatory-style training with the community and hopes to see participating actors at future auditions for collaborations with Ducdame Ensemble.

 

 Shakespeare’s views of classical antiquity
Jul
5
6:00 pm18:00

Shakespeare’s views of classical antiquity

  • Santa Fe Woman's Club

Our presentation tonight is by Duane W. Roller, professor emeritus of Greek and Latin at Ohio State University and author of Cleopatra: A Biography, published by Oxford Press. Dr. Roller will talk about Shakespeare’s views of classical antiquity and how they have formed modern perceptions—for better or worse.

He is a fascinating and knowledgeable speaker and this talk will prove enlightening!

Cost: $10

I have immortal longings in me.
— Cleopatra in Antony and Cleopatra
Apr
30
9:30 am09:30

Shakespearean Acting Workshop!

  • Eldorado Clubhouse

One full day workshop in Shakespearean acting!

Join in a full day investigation of Shakespearean acting. This workshop is led by the ISC Associate Artistic Director, Ariana Karp, who holds a Masters degree from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Ariana is a founding member of the award-winning Ducdame Ensemble in New York City.

You will enjoy and learn from:

  • Vocal coaching
  • Warm-up games and techniques
  • Master Class in scene work

Come with a favorite scene or speech you have memorized and would like to work on.
This workshop is available to aspiring actors of all ages.

Tuition: $50 payable to the Upstart Crows

To register, call: 505.466-3533
www.UpstartCrowsOfSantaFe.org

Location: Eldorado Community Center • Railroad Room

Apr
23
2:00 pm14:00

The ISC Official Launch Party

  • Zane Bennet Gallery

Celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday on April 23rd at the official public launch of the ISC! Find out about our National Shakespeare Reading Initiative, Youth Shakespeare Festival, our summer repertory season, the five-minute “Shakespeare in Santa Fe” film project, our ISC YouTube channel, and more. There will be music, dance, and performance, savories, birthday cake, and punch. Be a vital part of making Santa Fe a destination for all things Shakespeare! 

Feb
27
7:00 pm19:00

Geoff Hoyle: Lear’s Shadow

  • Lensic Performing Arts Center

Lear's Shadow is the sublime new solo show from award-winning actor and playwright Geoff Hoyle. It may be unheard of for a great clown to tackle Shakespeare’s masterpiece, but audiences are experiencing King Lear like never before as the Fool (played by Hoyle), recently unemployed, tells his side of Shakespeare’s most tragic, cosmic, and human of stories in this poignant solo performance. 

Hoyle, one of the Bay Area’s theatrical legends, tickles your funny bone and breaks your heart as he simultaneously depicts the Fool, the King, and all three of his daughters, playing his own original music with a storm of vocal sound effects. 

Lear's Shadow premiered in 2015 at The Marsh Theater in San Francisco, where the San Francisco Examiner called it “Sublime!” and “An astonishing tour de force.”

Dost thou know the difference, my boy,
between a bitter fool and a sweet fool?
— Lear in King Lear

Feb
27
1:00 pm13:00

So long lives this . . . Shakespeare’s Sonnets Live on Stage

  • Sue Cleveland Auditorium

In support of the First Folio residing in New Mexico, the Rio Rancho Public Libraries is pleased to present a program entitled, So long lives this . . . Shakespeare Sonnets Live on Stage.

New York actress and producer Robin Lane directs a troupe of professional actors and thespians in a once-in-a-lifetime performance of some of the most beautiful love poetry ever written. Feel the power of Shakespeare's 400-year-old words celebrating eternal love, immortal beauty, and the soul's depths.

For information, contact Joseph McKenzie at jmckenzie@rrnm.gov or 505.891.5013 x3034.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
— Sonnet 18
Feb
26
6:00 pm18:00

Hamlet, Hamlet, Hamlet

  • New Mexico History Museum

There were three distinct versions of Hamlet printed in the 1600s (Bad Quarto, Good Quarto, and First Folio). When most people see Hamlet performed, they get a version that mixes these three Hamlets, making the title character seem more passive and indecisive than the Hamlet character that appears in the Folio.

This talk aimed is at people who are interested in Shakespeare and want to know more about Hamlet or the First Folio. “We can go as deep as folks want to go in Q&A or informal conversation afterwards, but the presentation itself will be a jargon-free talk meant to be accessible and interesting to a general audience.” 
 
Joshua Calhoun is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who specializes in Shakespeare, 16th- and 17th-century poetry, and the history of media. He also teaches occasional courses in the environmental humanities. In his teaching and research, he explores three things that he loves—and thinks everyone else should love too—Shakespeare, old books, and nature.  FREE!

To be, or not to be, I there’s the point,
To Die, to sleepe, is that all? I all:
No, to sleepe, to dreame, I mary there it goes . . .
— Hamlet in Hamlet, Quarto 1, 1603
To be, or not to be, that is the question,
Whether tis nobler in the minde to suffer
The slings and arrowes of outragious fortune,
Or to take Armes against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing, end them, to die to sleepe
No more, . . .
— Hamlet in Hamlet, Quarto 2, 1604
To be, or not to be, that is the Question:
Whether ’tis Nobler in the minde to suffer
The Slings and Arrowes of outragious Fortune,
Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them: to dye, to sleepe
No more; . . .
— Hamlet in Hamlet, First Folio, 1623