Oct
26
10:00 AM10:00

Ben Crystal • Shakespeare acting workshop in Original Practice

The ISC and the Upstart Crows are hosting a unique opportunity for local actors: Join us for a workshop with British author, actor, and Passion Practice producer Ben Crystal.

This workshop explores the original practice of the theatre company Shakespeare worked in—how well did they know each other, what was their performance space like, and their writer? How did they turn their short rehearsal time to their advantage? We will be workshopping in the nature and tempo of an ensemble for a Shakespeare company, providing participants with take-away tools for future work on stage.

The author of Shakespeare on Toast: Getting a Taste for the Bard, Ben has also co-authored four books with his father, scholar David Crystal, including Shakespeare’s Words: A Glossary and Language Companion and the Oxford Illustrated Dictionary of Shakespeare. He appeared in the 2006 season at the Globe Theatre in London. In 2014 he and his theatre company (Passion in Practice) were awarded one of the inaugural Owls Schreame Awards for innovation in historical theatre, specifically for their work on Shakespearean Original Pronunciation (OP) in performance. That year he produced an original pronunciation production of Macbeth at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at the Globe. In 2015 he produced OP shows of Pericles and Henry V.

Reserve a spot by ordering a ticket below (after you click “Add to Cart,” a tiny cart icon appears in the upper right of this window; click on it to carry on with your order), OR contact Caryl@InternationalShakespeare.center.

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Oct
26
7:00 PM19:00

Ben Crystal talks on Original Pronunciation

An Evening with Ben Crystal and original pronunciation

The author of Shakespeare on Toast: Getting a Taste for the Bard, Ben has also co-authored four books with his father, scholar David Crystal, including Shakespeare’s Words: A Glossary and Language Companion and the Oxford Illustrated Dictionary of Shakespeare. He appeared in the 2006 season at the Globe Theatre in London. In 2014 he and his theatre company (Passion in Practice) were awarded one of the inaugural Owls Schreame Awards for innovation in historical theatre, specifically for their work on Shakespearean Original Pronunciation (OP) in performance. That year he produced an original pronunciation production of Macbeth at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at the Globe. In 2015 he produced OP shows of Pericles and Henry V.

The ISC and the Upstart Crows of Santa Fe host a public event featuring author, actor, and Passion Practice producer Ben Crystal. Ben will talk about and demonstrate Shakespeare’s Original Pronunciation. What did Shakespeare’s accent—and that of his actors and audience—sound like? What can we learn from hearing and speaking his works in that accent? And with no recordings or transcriptions available to us, how do we know? Actor and author Ben Crystal (Shakespeare's Words, Shakespeare on Toast) explores the fascinating 400-year-old sound of Shakespeare's plays and sonnets, Original Pronunciation, that shows a world full of rhyme, rhythm, and a very subtle humour, hidden beneath our modern accent readings. And a not-so-subtle world, too.

Friday • October 26 • 7 p.m.
El Museo Cultural
555 Camino de la Familia (at the Santa Fe Railyard)

Tickets:
$15 general • $10 students

Reserve a spot by ordering a ticket below (after you click “Add to Cart,” a tiny cart icon appears in the upper right of this window; click on it to carry on with your order), OR contact Caryl: 505-466-3533 or Caryl@InternationalShakespeare.center.

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Sep
29
3:00 PM15:00

Lynn Robson, Oxford Don, on King Lear and As You Like It

Lynn Robson, tutor at Oxford University, was awarded “Most Acclaimed Lecturer in the Humanities” at Oxford, among her other awards. Dr. Robson was in Santa Fe several years ago and provided a fascinating talk and discussion on Othello. We are thrilled to welcome her back again.

Lynn Robson presents a seminar that juxtaposes King Lear and As You Like It (that's the play with Rosalind in love with Orlando in the Forest of Arden), an interesting combination that will surely inspire new thoughts and ruminations.

It will help if you are familiar with both plays. If you don’t have time to read As You Like It, at least read Jacques’ speech, “All the world’s a stage,” below.

We guarantee you will come away with your mind buzzing with ideas and insights!

Tickets:
$30

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Having trouble? Call Robin 505.424.7926

. . . . . . . . . .

JACQUES:
All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women, merely Players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the Infant,
Mewling, and puking in the Nurse's arms:
Then, the whining School-boy with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the Lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his Mistress’ eye-brow. Then, a Soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble Reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth: And then, the Justice
In fair round belly, with good capon lin’d,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws, and modern instances,
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d Pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side,
His youthful hose well sav’d, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice
Turning again toward childish treble pipes,
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness, and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.

     Enter Orlando with Adam.

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Sep
14
7:00 PM19:00

King Lear

Shakespeare's King Lear

The cast of the ISC King Lear have been working with this play for a full year. They began in October 2017 and spent six months reading it closely; they participated in private workshops with Shakespearean acting coaches from the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario and with the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. They spent hours in fight workshops with Ambrose Ferber, director of Cadets de Gascon. They worked regularly with Dr. Robin Williams on speaking the text using the meter and clues Shakespeare provides, and with director Caryl Farkas on discovering what happens when the play is on its feet and relationships begin to develop.

We all look forward to experiencing the profound riches of this play with actors who have immersed themselves in its layers and subtleties.

Performances run from September 14 through September 30:
Friday • September 14 • 7 p.m.
Saturday • September 15 • 7 p.m.
Sunday • September 16 • 2 p.m.
Friday • September 21 • 7 p.m.
Saturday • September 22 • 7 p.m.
Sunday • September 23 • 2 p.m.
Friday • September 28 • 7 p.m.
Saturday • September 29 • 7 p.m.
Sunday • September 30 • 2 p.m.

Tickets:
$25 General admission
$15  Students

Click here to buy tickets at BrownPaperTickets.com

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Sep
4
6:00 PM18:00

King Lear with the Theatre Lovers Club

In the ongoing series of talks with the Theatre Lovers Club, Robin Williams and Caryl Farkas talk about the upcoming production of King Lear at the Adobe Rose.

Hear the director’s vision, what the cast has been doing this entire year in preparation, peek in at the rehearsal process, talk to a couple of the actors.

Conversation and refreshments after the talk.

Space is limited, so you MUST RSVP with Theatre Lovers Club!
Click here to RSVP.

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Yard Sale for King Lear
Aug
9
10:30 AM10:30

Yard Sale for King Lear

Yes, King Lear needs a yard sale! “O, reason not the need.”

This is a fundraising yard sale that directly goes to the ISC production of Shakespeare’s King Lear, the culmination of our Year of Lear. Please come support the production in a win-win situation—you go home with something you love AND you support the actors!

There is a wide variety of items, from furniture and jewelry to art and exercise equipment. And cookies!

See you there!
:-)

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Aug
9
10:30 AM10:30

Theatre Lovers Club • ISC King Lear production

As part of the Theatre Lovers Club series, Robin Williams and Caryl Farkas talk about the upcoming production of King Lear at the Adobe Rose. Hear the director’s vision, what the cast has been doing this entire year in preparation, peek in at the rehearsal process, talk to a couple of the actors. Refreshments and extra chatting afterwards!

Space is very limited. Event is FREE but you must RSVP to Theatre Lovers Club if you plan to attend: http://www.theatresantafe.org/tlc/

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May
25
3:00 PM15:00

James Shapiro and Shakespeare in America

Shapiro photo web.jpg

Please join us for drinks, Elizabethan appetizers, and conversation in an intimate, classic, Santa Fe setting.

This is an intimate event at a private home near St. John’s College, Santa Fe. Robert Benedetti acts as interlocutor to lead a conversation about Shakespeare in America.

James Shapiro is the Larry Miller Professor of English at Columbia University, where he has taught since 1985. His award-winning books include The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606; 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare; Contested Will; Shakespeare and the Jews; and the anthology Shakespeare in America.

He has also co-authored and presented two BBC documentaries: Shakespeare: The King’s Man and The Mysterious Mr. Webster.

Dr. Shapiro serves on the Board of Directors of the Royal Shakespeare Company, is Shakespeare Scholar in Residence at New York’s Public Theater, and has been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has also been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and has received an NEH Public Scholar Award.

Please join us to welcome Dr. Shapiro to Santa Fe!

Tickets:
$75 ($60 is tax deductible)
Proceeds benefit programming for the ISC Year of Lear.
Click here to buy tickets!

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May
24
6:00 PM18:00

James Shapiro and A Year of Lear

Shapiro photo web.jpg

James Shapiro is the Larry Miller Professor of English at Columbia University, where he has taught since 1985. His books include Shakespeare and the Jews (1996), republished in a 20th anniversary edition; 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare (2005) which won the Samuel Johnson Prize; Contested Will (2010); the anthology Shakespeare in America (2014); and The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606 (2015), which won the James Tait Black Prize. He has also co-authored and presented two BBC documentaries: Shakespeare: The King’s Man and The Mysterious Mr. Webster. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Royal Shakespeare Company and is Shakespeare Scholar in Residence at New York’s Public Theater, and has been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Shapiro has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and has received an NEH Public Scholar Award for 2017-18 for a book on Shakespeare in America.

Please join us to welcome Dr. Shapiro to Santa Fe. He will talk on King Lear and Shakespeare in America.

Tickets:
$26 General admission
Click here to buy tickets!

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Apr
3
6:00 PM18:00

Lear, Sears, and the Eight Leadership Traps

Lear, Sears, and the Eight Leadership Traps, with Jocelyn Davis

There are eight big traps for leaders. King Lear stumbles into them all.

Today, we can look at companies from Sears to J. C. Penney to Wells Fargo and see executives making the same mistakes. What can today’s leaders learn from Shakespeare's most tangled-up king—and why do these lessons come so hard?

Jocelyn Davis (JocelynRDavis.com) is an international leadership author and consultant. Her latest book, The Greats on Leadership, offers 25 centuries of leadership wisdom from history's masterminds: Shakespeare to Churchill, Machiavelli to Melville, Jane Austen to C. G. Jung, and many more.

$10 at the door
Students are free

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Mar
29
1:00 PM13:00

Why is the Nightingale in a Pomegranate Tree?

  • Renesan Institute for Lifelong Learning (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
nightingale.jpg

Shakespeare never mentions a bird, a plant, a tree, a gem, an herb, a goddess, a mythological character, etc., without pulling in the underlying significance of that item. In this conversational lecture, we'll examine a variety of examples of Shakespeare’s symbolism so we not only learn to see the fertile layers, but recognize when one needs to dig deeper. It can be quite thrilling to discover the hidden meanings of the poetry and recognize how understanding it not only enriches the work but also our appreciation for the author.

Robin Williams spent a lifetime writing computer and graphic design books, then formalized her long study of Shakespeare with an M.A. and Ph.D. from Brunel University London in Shakespeare studies. She is cofounder of the International Shakespeare Center and Director of iReadShakespeare.org. She designs and edits the Shakespeare plays specifically for people reading the works out loud and in community. Her most recent course for RENESAN was “‘To Be or Not To Be—What Does it Mean, Anyway?” and included a visit to Shakespeare’s First Folio in Spring 2016 to learn how such a book was created in 1623.

Fee: $10 at the door
Payable to RENESAN

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Mar
6
6:00 PM18:00

The Greatness of King Lear

There are Shakespearean tragedies, but none as tragic as King Lear; there is beautiful writing by the Bard, but none on a par with Lear. At a time when the ultimate monarch is in the news — Lear raging on the stormy moor, Trump raving in late-night tweets — what could be more timely than Jim Kaplan’s celebration of Shakespeare's greatest play during the ISC’s Year of Lear?

Jim Kaplan is a bridge columnist for the Vineyard Gazette and the author of Clearing the Bases: A Veteran Sportswriter on the National Pastime (Levellers Press). A contract adviser for the National Writers Union (United Auto Workers, Local 1981), Kaplan and his wife, poet and critic Brooks Robards, divide their time among Northampton and Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts, and Santa Fe. Kaplan can be reached at jkaplan105@gmail.com.

”Jim Kaplan has proven his virtuosity as a baseball writer again and again, but who knew he could hit to the opposite field? Jim illuminates King Lear with intelligence, wit, and an eye for the vital detail. This is scholarship with a colloquial lilt. It convinced me, against all prior conviction, that King Lear is indeed Shakespeare's greatest work.”
—John Hough, Jr., award-winning novelist

$10 at the door
Students are free

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Feb
6
6:00 PM18:00

The Winter’s Tale, Or the Alternate Lear: A Conversational Talk

The Winter’s Tale, Or the Alternate Lear: A Conversational Talk with Natalie Elliot

As with most of Shakespeare’s tragedies, at the end of King Lear we are left at a loss—at a loss for words, with a loss of hope, at a loss for ideas about what could come next. With the Winter’s Tale, however (which seems to have been written as Shakespeare revised Lear), we get an alternative kind of ending and a new genre. This genre—neither tragic nor comic—leaves us in a state of wonder.

In this conversational talk, we will explore the comic renewal of acts four and five and ask, what does Shakespeare mean to accomplish with the ending of The Winter’s Tale? To get the most out of this talk, participants are encouraged to read or reread The Winter’s Tale with a focus on the final two acts.

Natalie Elliot is a faculty member at St. John’s College, where she teaches cross-disciplinary courses in classics, history of science, mathematics, English literature, philosophy, and music. Natalie’s research focuses on early modern literary works that explore the cultural and philosophical significance of scientific discovery and technological change. Her past research has uncovered Francis Bacon’s mythological teaching on life-extension and explored the conflicts between classical tragedy and scientific progress. At present, she is at work on a book that explains Shakespeare’s poetic engagement with early modern science. Natalie holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Texas, where she specialized in political theory and focused on the study of politics through literature. In addition to her appointment at St. John’s College, Natalie has held research and teaching positions at The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, Indiana University’s Hutton Honors College, and Southern Methodist University.

$10 at the door
Students are free

St. John's College
Peterson Student Building
Second Floor, Senior Common Room

 

 

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Rodney Cottier, LAMDA, master classes
Jan
25
7:00 PM19:00

Rodney Cottier, LAMDA, master classes

The ISC is delighted to welcome back Rodney Cottier, Head of Drama at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art.

This Shakespeare acting master class is interactive, stimulating, and a great deal of fun! It runs approximately three hours and is geared to all levels of acting experience, with something for everyone—from those just starting out to old pros. Observers are also welcome! Check out Rodney’s Shakespeare teaching here: LAMDA

The more who attend, the merrier. No special preparation is required, but if you can, participants should please bring a copy of Shakespeare’s complete works, any edition.
 
Rodney Cottier
is also conducting a special workshop for the ISC cast of King Lear, which performs in September 2018. This workshop is at 2 p.m.; observers are welcome for $20 ($10 for students).

Date: Thursday • January 25
     Open Master Class • 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
     Observers to King Lear workshop • 2 to 5 p.m.

Cost:
     $30 all levels for Master Class
     $15 students with ID
     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     $20 for observers at the King Lear workshop
     $10 for student observers at the King Lear workshop

To register, click HERE!

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Dec
5
6:00 PM18:00

Midwinter Celebrations in King Lear

What would they eat in King Lear’s court, which historically existed in 800 BCE? This is the same moment at which Rome was originally founded.

Join Suzanne Cross as she entertains us with the food options and the ceremonies at this important time of year in ancient and pagan Britain.

Suzanne will prepare some of this food for us to eat! Suzanne has a rich background in food and a particular penchant for researching the food of Shakespeare’s world.

$10 at the door
Students are FREE

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Nov
7
6:00 PM18:00

The Readiness is All: Lessons from Youth Shakespeare

  • St. John’s College • Senior Common Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Caryl Farkas has been producing Shakespeare with young people for nearly 20 years. She worked with the Young Shakespeare Players in Madison, Wisconsin, doing educational outreach and directing, founded Upstart Crow Productions in Madison and, with her daughter Anna, started the Upstart Crows of Santa Fe.

The Santa Fe Crows began with three young actors (including Caryl’s younger daughter, Joy) in September 2014 who performed scenes from Twelfth Night. Those performances and outreach visits to Santa Fe schools expanded the company to 13 for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and then to two full casts for Julius Caesar. The Crows now number close to 40, with most members returning for each new production.

The philosophy of the company is that anyone between 10 and 18 years old who wishes to take part may join. There are no auditions; all participants receive substantial roles and become part of the collaborative community creating each productions. Most plays are produced uncut, with the actors taking pride in their understanding of the text. Productions involve two to four casts who rehearse separately and together, offering commentary and analysis on each other’s performances.

Caryl’s experience in Madison and here has been that immersion in the text, in community, produces intelligent and deeply felt performances. Her talk will include demonstrations by some of the Upstart Crows and a look at how the company approaches direction.

$10 at the door
Students are FREE!

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Nov
4
10:00 AM10:00

A Life with Lear • one-day seminar with Robert Benedetti

  • St John’s United Methodist Church, Garden Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Robert Benedetti says, “LEAR is my life play. It was the first play I ever directed. I was at the time the Artistic Director of the University of Chicago Court Theatre; it was 1958 (24 years before James Shapiro graduated from there) and I had Elder Olson and David Bevington as my dramaturgs. I played Lear once, and I’ve directed it three times since (roughly once every twenty years), and am ready to do it again when the opportunity presents itself. I am certain it is the greatest play in the English language.”

This is an all-day seminar in a comfortable setting. We will spend some time reviewing my lifetime with LEAR and going through a close reading of the play, with actors to read scenes as they arise. The focus will be on the play itself, plus the experiences of doing it at different cultural times (1958, 1965, 1975) and how the play lived at those times and places and with different casts. But most of the seminar is about how the play works internally.

Suitable for audience members, readers, actors, directors—anyone with an interest in this most remarkable of plays.

Limited to 25 participants.
$35 fee.
Please bring your own lunch.

To register online, click here.
Or send a check to ISC • 7 Sweet Swan Lane • Santa Fe • 87508
Or email Robin Williams for more info: robin@InternationalShakespeare.center

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Oct
3
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare as a Second Language

  • St. John’s College • Senior Common Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
BreshaunJoyner.jpg

Breshaun Joyner explores how students make meaning or understanding of Macbeth and how does teaching help or hinder that process. A defining feature of her teaching of Shakespeare is an approach that utilizes second language acquisition teaching techniques.

Breshaun is a doctoral candidate in the Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies department at University of New Mexico. This talk is based on her dissertation topic: “From WTF to Aha!: An Educator’s Journey in Teaching Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

Breshaun has taught in diverse learning environments for more than twenty years, which has helped her develop an educational philosophy that promotes the idea that a sense of inventiveness and a student-centered approach to instruction is vital. This effectively introduces new ideas to students and capitalizes on what they already know. It also challenges students to absorb and develop their own thoughts, resulting in an eagerness to build an ever growing and evolving body of knowledge. Moreover, Breshaun believes the teacher takes this journey as well, thereby creating a community of learners.

Breshaun first began her foray into Shakespeare exploration when she was asked to direct a summer Shakespeare camp at a small Midwest non-profit performing arts theatre. In the years she has taught Shakespeare, the tactic she feels is best is a broad approach utilizing numerous processes. Because students are not homogeneous in terms of their learning styles, abilities, and interests, it is important to employ a number of activities and lessons that can effectively stimulate each student’s individual intellectual strengths and that support cultural background and expression. English-as-a-Second-Language teaching strategies squarely supports this pedagogy.

$10 at the door.
Students are free!

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Sep
5
6:00 PM18:00

On King Lear: “No Lives Matter” with Krishnan Venkatesh

Krishnan Venkatesh helps to launch the ISC “A Year of Lear” with a talk about the good and evil in King Lear. Always an entertaining and provocative speaker, we are happy to have him back at the Shakespeare Talks!

On King Lear: "No Lives Matter"

 
Wisdom and goodness to the vile;
Filths savor but themselves.
— Albany to Goneril, 4.2.38–39
 

King Lear presents us with a world dominated by cruel, violent people, some deranged, some coldly calculating, and in such a world the innocent and good-natured seem destined to suffer. In this talk, we’ll be contemplating the different types of good and evil in the play, including servants, henchmen, and rulers. How do good and evil come about in such a world? Do they somehow generate each other? While all the bad people get their comeuppance here, is there any hope for the innocent and virtuous? Indeed, in such a world, is it “foolish” to be good?

Krishnan Venkatesh studied English literature at Magdalene College, Cambridge, and subsequently spent more than four years in research on Shakespeare at the University of Muenster, Germany, as a wissenschaftlicher mitarbeiter (scientific co-worker) for the great Shakespearean scholar Marvin Spevack. From 1986–89 he taught literature and philosophy at Shanxi University, People’s Republic of China. Both his personal and academic background make him well suited as a “bridge” between various traditions.

Since 1989 Mr. Venkatesh has taught at St. John’s College, Santa Fe, both in the two Western Great Books programs, and he was one of the shapers of the unique Eastern Classics Master’s program, in which he has taught for more than twenty years, understanding and speaking both Chinese and Sanskrit. From 2003–2008 he was the Dean of Graduate Studies at St. John’s.

$10 at the door

Students are free!

 

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Aug
1
6:00 PM18:00

The Demise and Rise of Serious Theater in America

We are delighted to host Tony Branch, founder of the British American Drama Academy in London, as he talks about the subject of his forthcoming book, the development, demise, and future of serious theater, including Shakespeare, in Britain and America.

Tony begins with the period between Elizabeth I and 1900, then the devastating impact of silent and sound movies, radio, and television, to the collapse of the British film industry that led to British actors taking to the stage, and the preference of American actors to work in film and television. Tony also discusses the vast difference in support for the arts between the U.K. and the U.S, the impact of musical theater, the state of theater today, and how we can help.

$10 at the door
Students are free

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Jun
15
7:00 PM19:00

Cues for Passion • A Shakespearean Mash-up

One night only! The International Shakespeare Center hosts Cues for Passion: A Shakespearean Mash-up at the Violet Crown.

Cues for Passion is a fast tour of Shakespearean resilience—confessions, grieving, the moody Dane, drama—delivered with heart.

Visiting Chicago Shakespeareans Lukas Brasherfons, Greer Dubois, and Ely Phan, and Anna Farkas Associate Artistic Director of the ISC, perform a farrago of scenes from Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, The Winter’s Tale, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Henry V.

Tickets $15 at the door.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lukas Brasherfons has an MFA in Dramaturgy from the Iowa Playwrights Workshop, where he was dramaturg, director, or fight-director for more than thirty plays. Dramaturgical projects in Chicago include work with Northlight Theatre, Chicago Dramatists, Mary-Arrchie Theatre Company, Raven Theatre, Next Theatre, the Den Theatre, and Writers Theatre.

Greer Dubois is a writer, performer, and prop/puppet designer who has acted with Forward Theater and Fermat’s Last Theater in Wisconsin and has directed young people at the Young Shakespeare Players, Children’s Theater of Madison.

Anna Farkas has a BA in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College, Santa Fe. She has directed and performed with the Young Shakespeare Players, Madison Shakespeare Company, Fourth Wall Players, Chrysostomos, Upstart Crow Productions in Madison, Wisconsin, and Upstart Crows of Santa Fe.

Ely Phan is a Chicago-based theater maker with a vested interest in abolishing the gender binary and subverting traditional narratives. He holds a BA in Theatre and French language from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As the Founding Artistic Director of Fermat's Last Theater in Wisconsin, he most recently directed Merchant of Venice and Troilus and Cressida.

Once enrolled together in the Young Shakespeare Players in Madison, these actors have been creating riveting theater since their teens. Cues for Passion will be a fast tour of Shakespearean resilience—confessions, grieving, the moody Dane, drama—delivered with heart.

Tickets $15 at the door.

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Jun
6
6:00 PM18:00

The Jaws of Darkness in a Midsummer Night’s Dream

As with every Shakespeare play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream has a surface level as well as deeper levels. In this presentation, we'll take a look at the darkness that hides beneath the veneer of the fairies and lovers gallivanting around in the forest, as well as the stories behind Theseus and Hippolyta. Is Shakespeare trying to make us notice something?

Presented by Robin Williams.

$10 at the door
Students are free!

 
Or if there were a sympathy in choice,
War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,
Making it momentany as a sound,
Swift as a shadow, short as any dream,
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say “Behold!”
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion.
— Lysander, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
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May
2
6:00 PM18:00

The Shakespeare Riots with Jonathan Richards

Jonathan Richards, a novelist, film critic, actor, and political cartoonist, will talk about the infamous Shakespeare Riots that rocked New York’s Astor Place in May of 1849.

The confrontation grew out of the rivalry between the great British actor William Charles Macready and his home-grown rival, Edwin Forrest, the first American Shakespearean superstar. Class tensions and nativist pride boiled over into a full-fledged donnybrook as a mob ten thousand strong stormed the Astor Place Opera House where Macready was performing. The mayor called out the state militia, who fired on the crowd. More than twenty people were killed, and many more were injured.

It was one of the deadliest riots in New York City’s history. And it had far-reaching consequences.

$10 at the door
Students are free!

 

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Apr
4
6:00 PM18:00

The Weight of Pathos in King Lear with Natalie Elliot

The Weight of Pathos in King Lear

One of the most profound and puzzling moments in Shakespeare’s corpus appears in King Lear, when Edgar leads the blinded Gloucester to an imaginary Dover. In this pathos-filled scene, Edgar pretends to bring his father to the cliffs, where Gloucester believes he will fall to his death. Since Gloucester is not actually at the edge, he does not fall and die, but Edgar is able to convince Gloucester that he has fallen.

The scene is puzzling because it shows that Gloucester is so ill-attuned to his spatial perceptions that he is willing to entertain the story that he has fallen. Why does Shakespeare stage this trick? To respond to the question, we will puzzle through some of Shakespeare’s poetic play with the nature of weight.


Natalie Elliot is a faculty member at St. John’s College, where she teaches cross-disciplinary courses in classics, history of science, mathematics, English literature, philosophy, and music. Natalie’s research focuses on early modern literary works that explore the cultural and philosophical significance of scientific discovery and technological change. Her past research has uncovered Francis Bacon’s mythological teaching on life-extension and explored the conflicts between classical tragedy and scientific progress. At present, she is at work on a book that explains Shakespeare’s poetic engagement with early modern science. Natalie holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Texas, where she specialized in political theory and focused on the study of politics through literature. In addition to her appointment at St. John’s College, Natalie has held research and teaching positions at The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, Indiana University’s Hutton Honors College, and Southern Methodist University.

$10 at the door

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Mar
7
6:00 PM18:00

Jocelyn Davis on Henry V and Crisis Leadership

Jocelyn Davis gives a fascinating talk about Henry V's leadership. "These are turbulent times. What can we learn from King Henry the Fifth about the keys to effective leadership in a crisis? Among other things: When disaster strikes, stay in the learning zone."

International business author and consultant Jocelyn Davis draws on her latest book, The Greats on Leadership, to show why Shakespeare is a leader’s best advisor when the world turns upside down.

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Jocelyn Davis is a writer and consultant with 25 years’ experience in the corporate learning industry. Before founding her company, Seven Learning, she was head of R&D for The Forum Corporation, a global leadership development firm. She is author of The Greats on Leadership: Classic Wisdom for Modern Managers (Hachette); co-author of Strategic Speed: Mobilize People, Accelerate Execution (Harvard Business Press); and has published widely on leadership, strategy execution, and workplace learning. Her clients have included companies such as Microsoft, Disney, and Unilever.

Known as an exceptional leader herself, Jocelyn is the recipient of awards for excellence in management and product innovation. She holds an M.A. in Philosophy and is currently working on a master’s degree in Eastern Classics at St. John’s College, Santa Fe.

$10

For more about Ms. Davis, see her web site: JocelynRDavis.com

 

 

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Feb
7
6:00 PM18:00

Ambrose Ferber on Fight Choreography

“A hit, a very palpable hit.”

To Elizabethans, swordplay and the study of “the fence” was integral to daily life. As such, the bladed action of the plays held a particular fascination for contemporary audiences. In this talk, we will discuss how Elizabethan companies staged these fights, and how the process has evolvedover the centuries, including mid-20th century all the way up the present day. We’ll also take a look at the sorts of weapons currently being used, how we balance realism, historical accuracy, and safety, and we’ll even have a chance to learn andpractice a few actual techniques. If you'd like to be a participant, be sure to wear clothing you can move around in, including something resembling an athletic shoe.

Ambrose Ferber got his start in theatre as an injured boy in Commedia dell'Arte when he was five and has since performed in Colorado, New Mexico, and North Carolina. Some of his favorite roles are Jack Worthing in The Importance of Being Earnest, John Jasper in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, John Hancock in 1776, Pablo Picasso in Picasso at the Lapin Agile, Barnette Lloyd in Crimes of the Heart, and Miles in The Drawer Boy. He got to swing steel as The Douglas in Henry IV, Part 1 and went on to serve as the fight captain, lead fighter, fight trainer, and fight director in a number of shows, including Romeo and Juliet, Les Miserables, Extremities, Cyrano, and Macbeth.

Ambrose is a certified Advanced Actor Combatant with the Society of American Fight Directors, and a member of Screen Actors Guild. Ambrose can be seen in the feature film Eyeborgs and in various TV shows, usually playing some kind of cop. He currently lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with his wife, Bex, and their daughters, Fiona and Chloe.

$10 at the door; students are free

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Jan
3
6:00 PM18:00

Sonnets: The Neurosis of Love with Krishnan Venkatesh

Krishnan Venkatesh, tutor at St. John's, speaks on the Shakespeare’s Sonnets: The Madness of Love.

There are really only two sonnet sequences in English that plumb the depths of love’s madness—Shakespeare’s Sonnets and George Meredith’s Modern Love. It is amazing what being in love can do to an otherwise reasonable person: all of a sudden we find ourselves tormented with desires and anxieties we didn't know we could have, or that we once had and thought we could outgrow. This evening we’ll study a handful of sonnets together in the hope of getting closer to Shakespeare's vision of “this crazy little thing called love.”

Krishnan Venkatesh has taught Western and Eastern Great Books at St. John’s College for almost thirty years. He is also a Shakespeare scholar, having spent several years on the minutiae of editions. Shakespeare has been central to his life for more than forty years, and at St. John's, reading the Works alongside writers like Plato and Montaigne has only deepened his respect for Shakespeare’s insight into the human condition.

$10, payable at the door

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Dec
20
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare’s Kitchen

Shakespeare’s language is full of the everyday world of 400 years ago and its food. From the traditional country market town of Stratford with simple roasts and few spices, to groaning banquets at Court (where perhaps the Players snatched the leftover “broken meats” after the show!) he would have been familiar with the whole range of Elizabethan and Jacobean cooking.

But what was food all about in that golden age and how does it differ from, and complement, our twenty-first century tastes? If you want to voyage to a nobleman’s house in 1606 for a banquet today, what would you choose to prepare that would be both authentic and tasty?

$10 payable at the door

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Suzanne Cross has been studying medieval and Elizabethan food since 1975, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art published a “curiosity” book about the cooking at the Court of Richard II, c. 1390. Her first “Queen’s Banquet” involved capon and Orangeado Pie in 1977. Since then, she’s presented Shakespearean Banquets in Santa Fe and points east and will discuss not only the fine points of food in Shakespeare’s Day, but recipes (including “kickshaws”) you can create to celebrate your own inner Will.

Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of short-legged hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kickshaws, tell William cook.
— Robert Shallow in 2 Henry IV
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Dec
3
1:00 PM13:00

Youth Shakespeare Festival

The ISC has been working with local educators and renowned Shakespeareans to celebrate Shakespeare with high school students, and December 3 is the Festival!

Since August, participating students from New Mexico School for the Arts, Santa Fe High School, Santa Fe Indian School, Academy for Technology and the Classics, and the Upstart Crows of Santa Fe have been working with professional Shakespearean actors and directors to hone their performances of short scenes from Shakespeare's plays, which they will present at the Youth Shakespeare Festival.

Guest artists include Devon Glover (The Sonnet Man), Ariana Karp (Ducdame Ensemble), Dr. Breshaun Joyner, and Dr. Robin Williams.

Visit our site for more details: YSFSantaFe.org.

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Nov
5
to Nov 12

Acting Shakespeare's Text with Wendy Chapin and Robin Williams

  • Armory for the Arts Theater (inside Bataan Military Museum) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Wendy Chapin and Robin Williams to explore both the text and acting of Shakespeare. The workshop is limited to ten actors.

Saturday • November 5 • 9 to noon
Work with Robin to discover what Shakespeare is telling you, the actor, in your chosen speech.

Saturday • November 12 • 9 to noon
Work with Wendy on how to apply action and intention to Shakespeare’s text.

Where: Santa Fe Performing Arts
Armory for the Arts Theater
(inside Bataan Military Museum)
1050 Old Pecos Trail • Santa Fe

Cost: $100
Register: SFPerformingArts@gmail.com
or 505.982.7992

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Nov
1
6:00 PM18:00

Shakespeare’s Genius as a Writer

If you think you love Shakespeare’s writing, just wait until Dr. Benedetti shows you just how amazing it us, just how skilled Shakespeare was as a writer. Bob will show us how Shakespeare takes advantage of the iambic pentameter rhythm and uses poetic techniques like no one has before or since.

Dr. Benedetti gives us a glimpse into Shakespeare’s mind at work—and it’s astounding.

Join us for an enlightening evening!

$10 at the door

For Orpheus’ lute was strung with poets’ sinews,
Whose golden touch could soften steel and stones,
Make tigers tame, and huge leviathans
Forsake unsounded deeps to dance on sands.
— Proteus in Two Gentlemen of Verona
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Oct
11
6:00 PM18:00

What is your Humour?

Why does Petruchio not let Kate eat the over-roasted meat? Why does Beatrice suddenly have a cold in the middle of the play, and Benedick has a toothache? Why does Othello have an epileptic fit and so readily believe Iago’s lies? Why is Ophelia’s death naturally by water?

These, and hundreds of other matters in Shakespeare’s plays, are related to the ancient theory of the humours, the four bodily spirits that control one’s temperament. Elizabethan medicine, cookbooks, herbals, and basic everyday living revolved around balancing these four humours. Robin Williams has studied the humours extensively and delights in helping us discover how to control our selves in an Elizabethan way.  ;-)

Download this personality test to determine which humour tends to run your personality, and discover which Shakespeare characters you are most akin to, and how to balance your own humours!

Cost: $10

As it is a spare life, look you, it fits my humour well.
— Touchstone in As You Like It
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