An exciting theater format!

Long Dead temporary logo.jpg

The ISC is developing an exciting new program called Long Dead But Well Read. It’s modeled on a program at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London called Read not Dead, in which actors convene on a morning, rehearse a play by a contemporary of Shakespeare’s during the day, and present the play in the evening, script in hand.

All performances listed below are at The Swan
1213 Parkway Drive • Santa Fe • NM • 87507
Second Saturdays • 7 p.m. • $15 at the door

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The Knight of the Burning Pestle

Directed by Karen Machon
Saturday • June 8

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Doctor Faustus, by Christopher Marlowe,

Directed by Nicholas Ballas
Saturday • July 13

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The Duchess of Malfi, by John Webster

Directed by Ariana Karp
Saturday • August 10

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The performances are instinctive, adrenaline driven, and inventive. Actors and audiences alike share in the excitement of reviving these forgotten plays that definitely deserve to be Read Not Dead. —Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

We inaugurated the ISC series with The True Chronicle History of King Leir, and his three daughters, Gonorill, Ragan, and Cordella. Our purpose in choosing this particular play during the ISC Year of Lear to launch Long Dead But Well Read is to see what another writer of Shakespeare’s time did with the same source material that Shakespeare used (Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain and Holinshed’s Chronicles). Why did Shakespeare change a commonplace historical event into such a bleak yet profound presentation of humankind? This production encouraged us to look more closely at the Lear we know.